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Adler University

Public Policy and Administration - Vancouver: Academic Honesty & Avoiding Plagiarism

Why to Cite Your Sources: Academic Honesty at Adler University

More important than knowing how to cite your sources is understanding why to cite your sources.

  • Plagiarism is a serious offense, punishable by expulsion from the University.  
  • For an explanation of plagiarism and other examples of academic misconduct, please see Adler University's Academic Honesty Policy here or in the PDF at the bottom of this page.

ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Adler University seeks to establish a climate of honesty and integrity. Any work submitted by a student must represent original work produced by that student. Any source used by a student must be documented through required scholarly references and citations, and the extent to which any sources have been used must be expressly stated in the work. The University further considers resubmission of work done partially or entirely by another, as well as resubmission of substantial or entire portions of one’s own work done in a previous course or for a different professor, to be academic dishonesty. It is the student’s responsibility to seek clarification from the course instructor about what assistance may be used to complete an assignment, examination, or project and what sources may be used. Students found guilty of academic dishonesty or plagiarism shall be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from the University.

Academic misconduct generally includes plagiarism and research misconduct—but academic misconduct is more broadly defined to refer to any action that involves illicit, unauthorized, fraudulent, or inappropriate behaviors designed to provide an undue advantage or otherwise aid in whole or part with the completion of required work at the Adler University. Students who commit academic misconduct, including plagiarism or research misconduct, are subject to a failing grade for the assignment and course and, potentially, immediate dismissal from their program and Adler University.

For the purposes of this policy, plagiarism is the submission, in whole or part, of unoriginal material, represented as original and as the work product of the individual student. Definitions are provided below for the following four types of plagiarism. These definitions are arranged by general level of severity, with auto-plagiarism generally being the least severe form of plagiarism, and fraudulent plagiarism typically being the most severe. That said, all occurrences of plagiarism, whether inadvertent or intentional, will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and students should be advised that the potential for sanctions up to and including immediate dismissal from Adler University exists for each type of plagiarism.

  • Auto-Plagiarism is the submission of work done for one course, assignment, or task for another. This form of plagiarism does not typically involve the submission of the work of others, but, instead, consists of representing as new work what has been previously submitted
  • Indirect Plagiarism is minimally rephrasing, paraphrasing or revising the work of others without proper citation or credit.
  • Direct Plagiarism is the substantial utilization of the published or unpublished work of others without permission, citation, or credit—also known as “cut and paste” or “patch writing.”
  • Fraudulent Plagiarism is purchasing or otherwise acquiring a work in its entirety and submitting it as one’s own is considered the most extreme and egregious form of plagiarism.

Additionally, definitions are provided below for five categories of research misconduct, which involves the misrepresentation of data or material in research. These definitions are also arranged by the general level of severity, with misrepresentation of effort or contribution generally being the simplest form of research misconduct, and data fabrication or falsification typically being the most severe. That said, all occurrences of research misconduct, whether inadvertent or intentional, will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and students should be advised that the potential for sanctions up to and including immediate dismissal from Adler University exists even for a first offense of research misconduct.

  • Misrepresentation of how much effort was expended, or the extent of original contribution made to a research project in which multiple contributors took part.
  • Withholding data or materials involves the refusal to make available for inspection, raw data and sources for student research.
  • Data manipulation involves the suppression or changing of study data to facilitate a desired outcome.
  • Data fabrication involves the intentional production of false or invented study or research data and representing such data as genuine.
  • Data falsification involves the intentional alteration of study or research data and representing such data as genuine.

Academic misconduct allegations will result in referral to the appropriate Student Development Committee. Depending on the severity of the academic misconduct at issue, the level of training, and circumstances associated with the misconduct, consequences will range from failure on specific assignments, or required supplemental education, to dismissal from the student’s program and Adler University. Students should be advised that violations can be intentional or inadvertent, and ignorance of this policy or of any restrictions in place in a particular situation regarding the means by which any assignment, examination, or project can be completed, will be no defense to an allegation of academic misconduct. For that reason, it is imperative that students promptly raise any questions or doubts regarding permitted methods or assistance to the appropriate instructor or advisor.